Is Basel III counter-cyclical: The case of South Africa?

Stellenbosch Working Paper Series No. WP10/2018
 
Publication date: June 2018
 
Author(s):
[protected email address] (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)
[protected email address] (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)
 
Abstract:

This paper develops a dynamic general equilibrium model with banking and a macroprudential authority, and studies the extent to which the Basel III bank capital regulation promotes financial and macroeconomic stability in the context of South African economy. The decomposition analysis of the transition from Basel II to Basel III suggests that it is the counter-cyclical capital buffer that effectively mitigates the pro-cyclicality of its predecessor, while the impact of the conservative buffer is marginal. Basel III has a pronounced impact on the financial sector compared to the real sector and is more effective in mitigating fluctuations in financial and business cycles when the economy is hit by financial shocks. In contrast to the credit-to-GDP ratio, the optimal policy analysis suggests that the regulatory authority should adjust capital requirement to changes in credit and output when implementing the counter-cyclical buffer.

 
JEL Classification:

E44, E47, E58, G28

Keywords:

Bank capital regulations, Financial stability, Counter-cyclical capital buffer, DSGE

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BER Weekly

3 August 2020
The week started with news of the confirmation of the $4.3 billion (bn) loan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) through its Rapid Financing Instrument. In the process of obtaining the loan, the government re-committed itself to the fiscal consolidation outlined in the supplementary budget presented in June, including to introduce zero-based...

Read the full issue