Father’s employment and sons’ stature: the long run effects of a positive regional employment shock in South Africa’s mining industry

Stellenbosch Working Paper Series No. WP02/2012
 
Publication date: 2012
 
Author(s):
[protected email address] (Research School of Economics, Australian National University and University of Stellenbosch)
 
Abstract:

I exploit the sudden increase in employment in 1975, 1976 and 1977 in four former South African homelands to compare the long term adult outcomes of children benefitting from the employment increase to those not subject to it. Using a standard difference in difference approach I find that there was severe malnutrition in the homelands resulting in stunting in African men born during the shock providing support to the foetal origins hypothesis. The employment shock did not affect other long term outcomes such as education and general health, although there is some evidence of an improvement in long term health. This study provides previously unmeasured individual level information on the quality of life in the homelands during apartheid, an era when African living standards were neglected but unmeasured because of a lack of data collection.

 
JEL Classification:

I31, N37

Keywords:

apartheid; living standards; stunting; difference-in-difference; foetal origins hypothesis

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BER Weekly

10 May 2021
Last week saw a number of noteworthy developments, with domestic COVID-19 and political developments attracting most attention. The biggest market-moving economic data release over the past week was the April US nonfarm payroll release late on Friday....

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