The opportunity cost of the upkeep of the criminal justice system in South Africa from 1980 to 2006

Stellenbosch Working Paper Series No. WP18/2009
 
Publication date: 2009
 
Author(s):
[protected email address] (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)
[protected email address] (Department of Accountancy, University of Stellenbosch)
 
Abstract:

South African crime rates rose to unacceptably high levels between 1980 and 2006. As a result, vast amounts of funds were devoted to the upkeep of the criminal justice system – correctional services, justice and the police. Although it is necessary to spend a certain amount on the criminal justice system, in South Africa this expenditure was excessive by most measures. The excess funds that were spent on the upkeep of the criminal justice system could have covered the cost of financing the entire backlog in schooling facilities and a large part of the current housing shortage.

 
JEL Classification:

D00, E62, H10, H40

Keywords:

crime, opportunity costs, criminal justice system, social services

Download: PDF (172 KB)

Login

(for staff & registered students)



Need a password?
Forgot your password?

Upcoming Seminars

No seminars are currently listed. Please check back soon.
 
More...

BER Weekly

12 Jul 2024
The international focus was on the US, with a key speaking engagement by Federal Reserve (Fed) Chair Jerome Powell and the headline inflation print important in shaping interest rate expectations. In Europe, the results and consequences of the French and UK elections stole the headlines. Locally, we saw parliament elect the chairs of various portfolio...

Read the full issue
 

Upcoming Seminars

No seminars are currently listed. Please check back soon.
 
More...

BER Weekly

12 Jul 2024
The international focus was on the US, with a key speaking engagement by Federal Reserve (Fed) Chair Jerome Powell and the headline inflation print important in shaping interest rate expectations. In Europe, the results and consequences of the French and UK elections stole the headlines. Locally, we saw parliament elect the chairs of various portfolio...

Read the full issue